Alan Turing (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954)

alan turing

turing doodle

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Turing

http://www.mathcomp.leeds.ac.uk/turing2012/

http://www.alanturing.net/

http://www.turingarchive.org/

http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~ian/TuringApology.html

Remarks of the Prime Minister Gordon Brown

10 September 2009

This has been a year of deep reflection – a chance for Britain, as a nation, to commemorate the profound debts we owe to those who came before. A unique combination of anniversaries and events have stirred in us that sense of pride and gratitude that characterise the British experience. Earlier this year, I stood with Presidents Sarkozy and Obama to honour the service and the sacrifice of the heroes who stormed the beaches of Normandy 65 years ago. And just last week, we marked the 70 years which have passed since the British government declared its willingness to take up arms against fascism and declared the outbreak of the Second World War.

So I am both pleased and proud that thanks to a coalition of computer scientists, historians and LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) activists, we have this year a chance to mark and celebrate another contribution to Britain’s fight against the darkness of dictatorship: that of code-breaker Alan Turing.

Turing was a quite brilliant mathematician, most famous for his work on the German Enigma codes. It is no exaggeration to say that, without his outstanding contribution, the history of the Second World War could have been very different. He truly was one of those individuals we can point to whose unique contribution helped to turn the tide of war. The debt of gratitude he is owed makes it all the more horrifying, therefore, that he was treated so inhumanely.

In 1952, he was convicted of “gross indecency” – in effect, tried for being gay. His sentence – and he was faced with the miserable choice of this or prison– was chemical castration by a series of injections of female hormones. He took his own life just two years later.

Thousands of people have come together to demand justice for Alan Turing and recognition of the appalling way he was treated. While Turing was dealt with under the law of the time, and we can’t put the clock back, his treatment was of course utterly unfair, and I am pleased to have the chance to say how deeply sorry I am and we all are for what happened to him. Alan and so many thousands of other gay men who were convicted, as he was convicted, under homophobic laws, were treated terribly. Over the years, millions more lived in fear of conviction. I am proud that those days are gone and that in the past 12 years this Government has done so much to make life fairer and more equal for our LGBT community. This recognition of Alan’s status as one of Britain’s most famous victims of homophobia is another step towards equality, and long overdue.

But even more than that, Alan deserves recognition for this contribution to humankind. For those of us born after 1945, into a Europe which is united, democratic and at peace, it is hard to imagine that our continent was once the theatre of mankind’s darkest hour. It is difficult to believe that in living memory, people could become so consumed by hate – by anti-Semitism, by homophobia, by xenophobia and other murderous prejudices – that the gas chambers and crematoria became a piece of the European landscape as surely as the galleries and universities and concert halls which had marked out European civilisation for hundreds of years.

It is thanks to men and women who were totally committed to fighting fascism, people like Alan Turing, that the horrors of the Holocaust and of total war are part of Europe’s history and not Europe’s present. So on behalf of the British government, and all those who live freely thanks to Alan’s work, I am very proud to say: we’re sorry. You deserved so much better.

Gordon Brown

Informazioni su Marco Vignolo Gargini

Marco Vignolo Gargini, nato a Lucca il 4 luglio 1964, laureato in Filosofia (indirizzo estetico) presso l’Università degli Studi di Pisa. Lavora dal 1986 in qualità di attore e regista in rappresentazioni di vario genere: teatro, spettacoli multimediali, opere radiofoniche, letture in pubblico. Consulente filosofico e operatore culturale, ha scritto numerose opere di narrativa tra cui i romanzi "Bela Lugosi è morto", Fazi editore 2000 e "Il sorriso di Atlantide", Prospettiva editrice 2003, i saggi "Oscar Wilde – Il critico artista", Prospettiva editrice 2007 e "Calciodangolo", Prospettiva editrice 2013, nel 2014 ha pubblicato insieme ad Andrea Giannasi "La Guerra a Lucca. 8 settembre 1943 - 5 settembre 1944", per i tipi di Tra le righe libri, nel 2016 è uscito il suo "Paragrafo 175- La memoria corta del 27 gennaio", per i tipi di Tra le righe libri; è traduttore di oltre una trentina di testi da autori come Poe, Rimbaud, Shakespeare, Wilde. Nel 2005 il suo articolo "Le poète de sept ans" è stato incluso nel 2° numero interamente dedicato a Arthur Rimbaud sulla rivista Cahiers de littérature française, nata dalla collaborazione tra il Centre de recherche sur la littérature français du XIX siècle della Università della Sorbona di Parigi e l’Università di Bergamo. È stato Presidente dell’Associazione Culturale “Cesare Viviani” di Lucca. Molte sue opere sono presenti sul sito www.romanzieri.com. Il suo blog è https://marteau7927.wordpress.com/ ****************** Marco Vignolo Gargini, born in Lucca July 4, 1964, with a degree in Philosophy (Aesthetic) at the University of Pisa. He works since 1986 as an actor and director in representations of various kinds: theater, multimedia shows, radio plays, readings in public. Philosophical counselor and cultural worker, has written numerous works of fiction, including the novels "Bela Lugosi è morto", Fazi Editore 2000 and "Il sorriso di Atlantide," Prospettiva editrice 2003, essays "Oscar Wilde - Il critico artista," Prospettiva editrice in 2007 and "Calciodangolo" Prospettiva editrice in 2013, in 2014 he published together with Andrea Giannasi "La guerra a Lucca. September 8, 1943 - September 5, 1944," for the types of Tra le righe libri, in 2016 he published "Paragrafo 175 - La memoria corta del 27 gennaio", for the types of Tra le righe libri; He's translator of more than thirty texts by authors such as Poe, Rimbaud, Shakespeare, Wilde. In 2005 his article "The poète de sept ans" was included in the 2nd issue entirely dedicated to Arthur Rimbaud in the journal "Cahiers de littérature française II", a collaboration between the Centre de recherche sur la littérature français du XIX siècle the Sorbonne University Paris and the University of Bergamo. He was President of the Cultural Association "Cesare Viviani" of Lucca. Many of his works are on the site www.romanzieri.com. His blog is https://marteau7927.wordpress.com/
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Una risposta a Alan Turing (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954)

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